Mint Builder Review – Good Opportunity Or Big Scam?

Mint Builder ReviewHas someone tried to pitch you the Mint Builder opportunity lately?

Mint Builder is a really popular and new opportunity that is making it’s rounds on social media among network marketers.

Now, first off, let me make it clear I am NOT promoting this business opportunity as an affiliate or distributor.

I have all the facts about this business in my Mint Builder review so you can learn the full truth about it!

Is Mint Builder a scam?

Can you make an honest business with Mint Builder?

Let me show you in my review of Mint Builder.

Read on for all the details.

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Mint Builder – What Is It??

Taking a gander at the Mint Builder website, you won’t find any readily available info in regards to who owns the company, when it was founded, or anything along these lines.

The domain name for the site (mintbuilder.com) was first registered on October 12, 2017, the owner is Matt Barkes, and an incomplete address in West Sussex is provided.

I tracked down a Facebook profile for Barkes, and here it’s stated that he lives in Indiana in the United States. This is far different from West Sussex in the United Kingdom, but this is likely where Mint Builder is actually being run out of.

If Barkes’ name sounds familiar, that’s because this isn’t the first time his face popped up in the MLM space.

Back in 2012, Barkes was discovered to be the CEO and Founder of the ISN Coins opportunity.

For those that don’t remember, ISN Coins was a pyramid scheme that quickly collapsed and then saw a reboot in 2014 with a reworked compensation plan.

Just like the first ISN Coins, ISN Coins 2.0 had absolutely no retail presence and was focused primarily on autoship recruitment and getting as many affiliates as possible to join and sink money into the company.

Now in 2018, the domain for ISN Coins isn’t even listed likely due to the fact that it has since collapsed once again.

If you go to the ISN Coins website, you’ll be presented with a popup that says ISN Coins “is now Mint Builder.”

Matt Barkes’ name doesn’t actually show up anywhere on the Mint Builder website, but even so, it’s safe to assume that he’s the one running the show.

Mint Builder Scam

The Product Line For Mint Builder

What Mint Builder’s website does say is that it offers “fine mint coins” in both gold and silver. There are quite a few coins to choose from, and while you can get some for as cheap as $20, you can also pay over $475 depending on what you buy.

What Should I Know About The Compensation Plan?

As for the compensation plan, affiliates for the company appear to earn a commission when they sell these coins to retail customers. Retail customer are mentioned, but the strange thing is that exact details on retail commissions aren’t anywhere to be found.

Along with this, and perhaps a bigger focus for Mint Builder, is that of recruitment commissions.

Recruitment commissions within the company are handled using a binary system, and as you’d expect, affiliates are rewarded as they get more and more people to join the company.

Points are generated throughout the binary when affiliates join and pay for the Monthly Graded Mint Coin, and as more points are generated, more money is paid out.

How Do I Join Mint Builder?

If you’re interested in joining Mint Builder, you’ll be required to hand over a membership fee of $199 every single year.

Is Mint Builder Really A Scam?

Have you been hearing that Mint Builder is a scam?

Have you heard Mint Builder is legit?

It can be hard to tell with so many different people telling you different things.

So, what’s the truth – is Mint Builder a scam or is it a good business?

I would say it’s not really a scam. There are a few things you should be aware of before joining.

The best way to be successful is to be prepared going in, and have a plan to market yourself.

If you want help marketing and making money, see below.

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Conclusion for Mint Builder

Two versions of ISN Coins have come and gone, and as such, Barkes’ latest attempt at soliciting cash from folks comes in the form of Mint Builder.

It’s technically possible that Mint Builder’s setup could work as a legit retail operation, but even wording on the website leads you to believe that this isn’t the case.

“Can I access cost pricing without joining MintBuilder?

Unfortunately not, in order to access the amazing savings enjoyed by our members you must become a MintBuilder wholesale customer yourself.”

Retail customers can buy coins from Mint Builder, but it’s extremely cheaper to do so as an affiliate.

Furthermore, all affiliates are heavily encouraged to sign up for an autoship order with the Graded Mint Coin plan.

If you notice a lot of similarities compared to ISN Coins, that’s because there are.

The possibility of retail sales doesn’t always mean that an opportunity you’re looking at is legitimate, and Mint Builder is a perfect example of this. While retail sales do exist, they aren’t used in a way that makes this an honest, retail-focused company.

This is an autoship recruitment scheme through and through, and unless that sounds like something you want to get involved with, I suggest staying far away from this one.

I hope you got all the details you needed to make an informed decision in this Mint Builder Review.

Bears of anyone trying to sell you something in their review articles.

If you do want to proceed with Mint Builder, make sure you know how to market properly.

My FREE training below will help you.

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